Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council
Loading
Skip Navigation Links

Restoration Projects

 

Restoration Remedies Program
A technical service of the Watershed Council

Northern Michigan's lakes, streams and wetlands are precious natural resources. Their protection is vital in preserving the 'Up North' character that is so special. One of the most important ways you can protect your lake or stream is to control erosion and sedimentation of your shoreline or streambank. Erosion and sedimentation can have a serious impact on water quality, wildlife habitat, and property values.

An effective method referred to as "biotechnical erosion control" provides the most cost-effective, environmentally friendly and aesthetically appealing alternative to controlling accelerated shoreline erosion. The Watershed Council can develop restoration designs based on this method, as well as apply for the required state and local permits and coordinate the installation of the project.

If you are concerned about the condition of your property's shoreline, streambank or wetland, the Watershed Council offers a variety of services through our Restoration Remedies Program. Below are some of our featured restorations. For more information about the Restoration Remedies Program, contact Jennifer Gelb at (231) 347-1181 or e-mail her at  jen@watershedcouncil.org.



Restoration Remedies Program - Featured Project #1

The Evangeline Township Park on Lake Charlevoix
Glenwood Beach Drive
The Evangeline Township Park at Glenwood Beach provides public access to Lake Charlevoix. Recognizing the need for a more user-friendly park that provides recreational opportunities while protecting water quality, the Township contracted with the Watershed Council to develop plans for a shoreline enhancement project, including a demonstration greenbelt.

Large, broken pieces of concrete
blanket the slope creating a hazardous
approach to the lake.

BEFORE

Harbor Springs Excavating started by removing
the concrete rubble to create a clean slate for
New Savanna Landscape Company.

DURING

Native planting pockets are incorporated
into fieldstone revetment.

AFTER

Access to the lake can be gained
safely by way of new stairs.

AFTER

"Evangeline Township is very happy with the new shoreline protection
structure at Glenwood Beach, it looks really terrific. It was great working
with Tip of the Mitt, whose staff was pleasant and professional, and
whose guidance helped assure project completion."

Shannon McMaster, Boyne City Assistant Planner/Zoning Administrator


Restoration Remedies Project - Featured Project #2

Pigeon River
Streambank Restoration

With the generous support of Mullett Area Preservation Society (MAPS), the Watershed Council provided bioengineering design, permit application services, and installation supervision to stabilize a stretch of Pigeon River stream bank. The bioengineering solution included using prefab soil lift structures made from coir (coconut fibers) and alternating with bare-root dogwood and ninebark shrubs. Cobble was installed at the toe of the streambank. In order to provide additional support to the streambank, the property owners have implemented a no-mow zone extending the length of the former slump. Installation was limited to hand tools to avoid further stress to the streambank.
BEFORE

Approximately 35 linear feet
on the Pigeon River slumped likely
as a result of high water levels
in early spring of 2008.

AFTER INSTALLATION
The exposed face of the soil
lifts can be seen. Dogwood and
ninebark saplings are planted
between the layers.
1 YEAR AFTER
INSTALLATION
Nearly one year after installation,
the shrubs have begun to fill in and the
slope remains stabile. Over time, the
project will become less and less
evident as the vegetation grows and
the area blends in with the
natural riparian areas.

"Without the able assistance of the professional staff at TOMWC we would
be stymied as to how to keep restoring various problem areas of stream bank
erosion on the Pigeon River that MAPS has been financing for many years."

Mullett Lake Preservation Society (MAPS)


Shoreline and Streambank Erosion Control

The Watershed Council can provide different levels of contract services for shoreline and streambank restoration needs. The first step is to complete our Shoreline, Streambank, and Wetland Questionnaire. After reviewing your questionnaire, we will contact you to discuss your options. This may include scheduling a site assessment where Watershed Council staff will visit your shoreline or streambank property, document the current conditions, and recommend courses of action. In some cases, a restoration plan or design is recommended to curb the progression of erosion and sedimentation, and "restore" the shoreline or streambank to its former condition. An effective method referred to as "biotechnical erosion control" provides the most cost-effective, environmentally friendly and aesthetically appealing alternative to controlling accelerated shoreline erosion. The Watershed Council can develop restoration designs based on this method, as well as apply for the required state and local permits and coordinate the installation of the project.

Greenbelt and Habitat Enhancement

Regardless of whether or not your shoreline or streambank is experiencing erosion, the Watershed Council can help you restore the riparian buffer by providing greenbelt design and habitat enhancement services. Designs incorporate aesthetics and wildlife habitat, all while accommodating your shoreline or streambank needs. Native plants are emphasized due to their effectiveness at stabilizing shorelines and streambanks, their habitat value, suitability to local conditions, and their natural "fit" in the landscape.

 

Stormwater Runoff Prevention

Help prevent stormwater runoff! Where does rain or water from snow go? Lawns and gardens absorb some of it, but water can't soak into driveways, sidewalks, rooftops, and other hard surfaces (also called impervious surfaces). When stormwater runoff flows over roads, sidewalks, lawns, and gardens, it picks up substances like dirt, fertilizers, oil, salt, and bacteria. Additional pollution comes from nutrients used in fertilizers applied to lawns and gardens, as well as pet waste, and sediments from soil particles that are washed away from bare spots in lawns and gardens, roadways, and other areas of exposed soils. Stormwater can also contain other pollutants such as toxins and heavy metals. Most stormwater runoff washes into nearby water bodies carrying these pollutants from the places where we live and work into lakes and streams. To learn more about stormwater and what you can do to prevent it, click here to download a copy of our brochure, Clean Water is Everyone's Business. (Please note this brochure's file size is 3MB. If you have a dial-up connection this download may take several minutes.) 

 

Did you know?

Watershed Council members receive a 10% discount off Restoration Remedies services. Support Tip of the Mitt Watershed by becoming a member today and start enjoy the benefits of membership.

Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council • 426 Bay Street, Petoskey, MI 49770
PH: (231) 347-1181 • Fax: (231) 347-5928 • www.watershedcouncil.org
Copyright © 2014 by Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council. All rights reserved. SiteMap
Powered by SiteChalk